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cedryk Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 975 W: 50 N: 1722] (5270)
Dear Friends,
Today I'd like to share with you a spring image from quite a distant past and from thousands kilometers away. Also, to my surprise it looks as this is the first presentation of this animal on TN. So, Ladies and Gentelmen, let me introduce to you:

Pseudacris crucifer
- spring peeper
Family: Hylidae - treefrogs and their allies
Order: Anura
Class: Amphibia


Spring peeper is a small frog (2-3 cm in length) native to eastern North America. Its range spreads from southeast Manitoba east to the Atlantic Ocean, and south to eastern Texas and mainland Florida. They live typically in marshy woodlands and non-wooded lowlands near ponds and swamps. Unlike many other treefrogs, they inhabit the bottom of the forest: leaf litter and wood debris. They are nocturnal species hunting for various small invertebrates.

They are typical chorus frogs, one of the first to announce the upcoming spring. Only males make sounds trying to attract the females. You may here their vocalisations here. Eggs (usually from 900 to 1000) are laid in small pond, often temporary that dry completely after the young frogs emerge after about 8 weeks of development.

Its name Pseudacris crucifer may be translated as "false cricket bearing cross". First part of the name is obviously derived from its loud voice, second from the pattern it has on its back. You may see it in the workshop - a picture of another individual, taken from different pov.

At first I was quite surprised that this quite common and loudly singing animal has not been pictured on TN before. Then I recalled that it wasn't easy to take these pictures. Spring peepers are active at night. So you must go to the forest at night and wirtually crawl on its bottom, because they sit just above the ground. Quite a task if you are aware of the rattlesnakes living in the area. Then you must spot a singing individual what is not easy when they sing in a choir. When you crawl you must be very quiet not to scare them. Otherwise they will stop singing. When you spot a singing male you have to make it comfortable with you so it will start singing again. Or you need to get it started some other way... One smart way is to tease it with a song of another male recorded earlier on a dictaphone. If you are happy, you will end with a couple of pictures with satisfying quality. And believe me, focusing with a manual camera in such conditions was quite a challenge :-)

Anyway, I hope you enjoy my work...
Best greetings and Happy Easter!


This shot was taken on Kodachrome ED200 35 mm slide flim. The slide was scanned with Plustek OpticFilm 7200i scanner.

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cedryk Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 975 W: 50 N: 1722] (5270)
habitat of Pseudacris crucifer
Edited by:cedryk Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 975 W: 50 N: 1722] (5270)

Typical habitat of the spring peeper. A bayou and surrounding forest in Ocean Springs, Mississippi.

Altered Image #1

cedryk Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 975 W: 50 N: 1722] (5270)
another pov
Edited by:cedryk Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 975 W: 50 N: 1722] (5270)

Here is another individual with the cross pattern visible on its back.